Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Radioisotope Thermal Generator
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: To provide electricity to operate scientific instruments and subsystems.
Image Sources: NASA

Description

The nuclear assembly was carried on the outside of the lunar module on its journey to the moon. This allowed the heat generated by the fuel capsule to be dispersed in space and for adequate shielding to protect the astronauts. The power was provided by SNAP-27, one of a series of radioisotope thermoelectric generators, or atomic batteries, developed by the Atomic Energy Commission.

The SNAP (Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power) programme is directed at development of generators and reactors for use in space, on land and in die sea. While nuclear heaters were used in the seismometer package on Apollo 11, SNAP-2 7 on Apollo 12 marked the first use of a nuclear electrical power system on the Moon. It was designed to provide all the electricity for continuous one-year operation of the scientific instruments and supporting subsystems deployed by the astronauts on the lunar surface.

Read more:
https://www.iaea.org/sites/default/files/publications/magazines/bulletin/bull12-1/12104700912.pdf

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Flag Kit
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: The placement of the flag of the United States on the Moon was strictly a symbolic activity, as the Outer Space Treaty precludes any sovereign claim over territory in space or on any celestial body other than Earth.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The flag-raising offered an interesting technical challenge in that the flag had to “fly” without wind. Other factors considered in the design were weight, heat resistance, and ease of assembly by astronauts whose space suits restricted their range of movement and ability to grasp items. The flag kit had three parts. There are two vertical sections, and a horizontal crossbar that’s hinged at the top of the upper vertical section. To deploy the flag, one astronaut used a sampling hammer to pound the lower vertical section into the ground. The other astronaut extended the telescoping crossbar and raised it to a 90-degree angle with the vertical section to click it into place. Then the two astronauts slid the upper part of the pole into the lower one.

Read more:
https://historycollection.jsc.nasa.gov/JSCHistoryPortal/history/flag/flag.htm

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Lunar Module Intrepid (Ascent Stage)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: -3.94 N, -21.20 E
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Per the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum: “The Lunar Module (LM) was used for descent to the lunar surface and served as a base while the astronauts were on the Moon. A separate ascent stage, comprising the top portion of the Lunar Module, lifted the astronauts from the Moon’s surface to rendezvous and dock with the command module, orbiting the Moon.” Following crew transfer, the ascent stage was remotely guided to impact on the lunar surface to provide an active seismic source for the passive seismic experiment that had been emplaced.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Per the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum: The lunar module had two stages:

  1. A silver-and-black ascent stage, containing the crew’s pressurized compartment and the clusters of rockets that controlled the spacecraft.
  2. A gold-and-black descent stage, similar to the ascent stage, containing a main, centrally located rocket engine and tanks of fuel and oxidizer.

The descent (lower) stage was equipped with a rocket motor to slow the rate of descent to the lunar surface. It contained exploration equipment and remained on the Moon when the astronauts left. The ascent (upper) stage contained the crew compartment and a rocket motor to return the astronauts to the orbiting command module. After the crew entered the command module for the trip back to Earth, the lunar module was released and eventually crashed into the Moon. To rejoin the command module, the astronauts fired the ascent-stage rocket engine and lifted off, leaving the descent stage on the Moon.

The ascent stage met and docked with the command module in lunar orbit. The ascent stage then was programmed to crash into the Moon.

Read more:
https://airandspace.si.edu/exhibitions/apollo-to-the-moon/online/apollo-11/about-the-spacecraft.cfm

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Central Station
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: -3.00942 N, -23.42458 E
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: 30 September 1977
Function: Monitor lunar seismic activity.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) consisted of a set of scientific instruments emplaced at the landing site by the astronauts. The instruments were arrayed around a central station which supplied power to run the instruments and communications so data collected by the experiments could be relayed to Earth.

The central station was a 25 kg box with a stowed volume of 34,800 cubic cm. Thermal control was achieved by passive elements (insulation, reflectors, thermal coatings) as well as power dissipation resistors and heaters. Communications with Earth were achieved through a 58 cm long, 3.8 cm diameter modified axial-helical antenna mounted on top of the central station and pointed towards Earth by the astronauts. Transmitters, receivers, data processors and multiplexers were housed within the central station.

Data collected from the instruments were converted into a telemetry format and transmitted to Earth. The ALSEP system and instruments were controlled by commands from Earth. The uplink frequency for all Apollo mission ALSEP’s was 2119 MHz, the downlink frequency for the Apollo 12 ALSEP was 2278.5 MHz.

Read more:
https://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/nmc/spacecraft/display.action?id=1969-099C

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Lunar Module Intrepid Descent Stage (plaque attached)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: -3.01239 ̊ N, -23.42157 ̊ E
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: 24 November 1969, 20:58:24 UTC
Function: The Apollo 12 descent stage was designed to support a powered landing on the Moon, support extra-vehicular activities, and provide a launch pad for the ascent stage. It demonstrated the ability to land within walking distance of a specified target.
Image Sources: NASA and University of Oregon

Description

Per the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum: The lunar module had two stages:

  1. A silver-and-black ascent stage, containing the crew’s pressurized compartment and the clusters of rockets that controlled the spacecraft.
  2. A gold-and-black descent stage, similar to the ascent stage, containing a main, centrally located rocket engine and tanks of fuel and oxidizer.

The descent (lower) stage was equipped with a rocket motor to slow the rate of descent to the lunar surface. It contained exploration equipment and remained on the Moon when the astronauts left.

The ascent (upper) stage contained the crew compartment and a rocket motor to return the astronauts to the orbiting command module. After the crew entered the command module for the trip back to Earth, the lunar module was released and eventually crashed into the Moon. To rejoin the command module, the astronauts fired the ascent-stage rocket engine and lifted off, leaving the descent stage on the Moon. The ascent stage met and docked with the command module in lunar orbit. The ascent stage then was programmed to crash into the Moon.

A commemorative plaque is affixed to the ladder on the descent stage of the Apollo 12 Lunar Landing Module. Each of the Apollo lunar landing missions included a similar plaque. The plaque is stainless steel and measures 22.9 by 19.4 centimeters. The plaque bears the signatures of astronauts Charles “Pete” Conrad, Alan L. Bean and Richard F. Gordon, Jr.

Read more:
https://airandspace.si.edu/exhibitions/apollo-to-the-moon/online/apollo-11/about-the-spacecraft.cfm

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Camera, Lunar Surface, Electric Hasselblad
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Photographs taken under operation conditions supported postflight anomaly analyses, vehicle documentation and inspection requirements, crew mobility studies, scientific evaluations, and equipment evaluations. Perhaps the most important photographs supported lunar sample documentation, lunar experiments location, and lunar terrain description, since photographs were the primary data source for satisfying lunar exploration objectives in these areas. The photographs also served the function of playing to the scientific community and the public at large the exploration results in space and on the lunar surface, thereby sharing Apollo achievements with people throughout the world. Early photographs of the lunar surface during the lunar landing development missions served to update existing lunar maps.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Lens, 60mm
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Photographs taken under operation conditions supported postflight anomaly analyses, vehicle documentation and inspection requirements, crew mobility studies, scientific evaluations, and equipment evaluations. Perhaps the most important photographs supported lunar sample documentation, lunar experiments location, and lunar terrain description, since photographs were the primary data source for satisfying lunar exploration objectives in these areas. The photographs also served the function of playing to the scientific community and the public at large the exploration results in space and on the lunar surface, thereby sharing Apollo achievements with people throughout the world. Early photographs of the lunar surface during the lunar landing development missions served to update existing lunar maps.
Image Source: NASA

Description

70-millimeter Hasselblad Data Cameras used a 60-millimeter Biogon lens exclusively. (LPI)

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Adapter, Rt. Angle, 16mm camera
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Cable, Remote Control, 16mm camera
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Protective cover, Reseau
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Assist with measuring items in photographs.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The lunar surface Hasselblad cameras were fitted with a device called a reseau plate. The reseau plate is a clear glass plate on which is etched small black crosshairs, called “fiducials” by some and “reticles” by others. A reseau grid is used in the science of photogrammetry to establish a geometrical basis for measuring objects in photographs. It can be used to correct for any misalignment of the film in the camera, or distortions in the image after development or electronic scanning.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Trigger, Electric Hasselblad Camera
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The operating sequence of the 70-millimeter Hasselblad Data Cameras was initiated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. (LPI)

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Handle, Electric Hasselblad Camera
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Suggested
Suggested contents and articles.
Suggested Contents
Apollo 13: Crewed Lunar Landing
The Apollo 13 lunar landing was aborted after an oxygen tank in the service module failed two days into the mission. The story of Apollo 13 is an enduring tale of survival, perseverance and innovation in the face of emergency.
Apollo 11: Crewed Lunar Landing
The primary objective of Apollo 11 was to complete a national goal set by President John F. Kennedy on May 25, 1961: perform a crewed lunar landing and return to Earth.
Apollo 10: Crewed Lunar Orbit
The Apollo 10 mission encompassed all aspects of an actual crewed lunar landing, except the landing. It was the first to operate around the Moon. Objectives included a scheduled eight-hour lunar orbit of the separated lunar module, or LM, and descent to about nine miles off the Moon's surface before
Comments
All comments.
Comments