Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Tether, EVA Retractable
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Bolt Cutter
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Astronaut Pete Conrad carried the bolt cutters on his back during the EVA to Surveyor III. Conrad used the cutters to cut the Surveyor’s electrical cable and gather samples of painted tubing.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Remote Control Units for PLSS (two left on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: The Remote Control Unit was worn on the front of the spacesuit and was connected to the Portable Life Support System (PLSS). It provided the astronaut with the ability to monitor the life support systems and adjust the controls of the PLSS.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Per NASA: The Remote Control Unit was a component of the total Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit system, which also included the Portable Life Support System (PLSS), Oxygen Purge System (OPS), and the suit itself. The system was added to the EMU after the redesign following the Apollo 1 accident. Mounted on the chest of the EMU, the system provided simple controls for communications and some EMU functions, as well as warnings and indicators for EMU status. It had a secondary function as a mounting for the standard Apollo Hasselblad camera and Oxygen Purge System actuator.

Read more:
https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/alsj-RCU.html

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Bracket, Camera mount
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: The 70-millimeter Hasselblad Data Cameras were bracket-mounted on the front of the LM astronauts’ EVA suits.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: ECS LiOH Cannister/Cartridge (two left on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: The lithium hydroxide (LiOH) canister held 3.12 pounds of LiOH used to purify the oxygen in the Portable Life Support System (PLSS).
Image Source: NASA

Description

The lithium hydroxide canister was designed to maintain a pure-oxygen environment within the Apollo spacecraft by filtering out carbon dioxide, odors, and debris. The LiOH within the canister absorbed carbon dioxide, and carbon in the form of charcoal eliminated odors.

The circulation within the spacecraft also carried debris to the canister, trapping it in the filter. The lithium hydroxide canister was designed as a replaceable filter for the environmental control unit (ECU). The ECU provided cooling, water and breathable oxygen for the astronauts’ suits and cabin. Two canisters were present in the oxygen system at all times and were alternately replaced, one every twelve hours.

To maintain a safe pure-oxygen environment, the canisters contained lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and charcoal and were covered by a felt cloth barrier. The LiOH within the canister absorbed carbon dioxide, the charcoal eliminated odors, and the felt trapped particles and debris.

Read more:
http://www.space1.com/Artifacts/Apollo_Artifacts/LiOH_Canister/lioh_canister.html

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Battery, PLSS
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Power supply for life support.
Image Source: NASA

Description

At 390 watt-hours, the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) held enough battery to support a single EVA. The first battery was installed before launch, the second replaced the first before the second EVA, and spare batteries were brought aboard.

Object on or Related to Site
Object

Object Name: Defecation Collection Device
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Per NASA: The Apollo fecal-collection system consisted of the fecal-collection assembly (FCA) on the CM and the defecation-collection device (DCD) on the LM. The design and operation of the DCD are similar to the design and operation of the FCA. The FCA provides and proceeds with fecal elimination. Upon completion of the action and subsequent sanitary cleansing, the tissues and refuse are placed in the inner fecal/emesis bag. The crewman then removes the germicide pouch, cuts the outer protective seal, and places it in the inner bag. Finally, all items are placed into the outer fecal bag, the bag is sealed, the germicide pouch is ruptured by hand pressure, the bag is kneaded, and the contents are stowed in the waste-stowage compartment.
Image Sources: NASA and Air and Space Museum Smithsonian Institute

Description

“The system is self-contained, giving the astronaut flexibility and control in a weightless environment, and allows for a simple and hygienic disposal. The paper on the round end was removed to expose an adhesive portion that astronauts could affix to themselves and use to seal the bag after use. A germicidal tablet was then activated inside the bag to kill bacteria and the bag was placed in a containment bag for storage and disposal.”

Read more:
https://airandspace.si.edu/node/33242

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Lunar Overshoes
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: The lunar overboot was designed to give astronauts thermal and abrasion protection, as well as extra traction in the slippery lunar dust.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Per Air and Space Museum Smithsonian Institute: The overshoes were designed to be worn over the Apollo spacesuit boots while an astronaut was walking on the Moon. The International Latex Corporation made the overshoes which were worn over the boots that were integrated into the spacesuit and which included the pressure bladder and thermal coverings. The boots were made with a silicone sole, woven stainless steel upper (Chromel-R), and included additional layers of thermal protection and beta felt in the soles as protection against extreme temperatures and sharp rocks on the lunar surface.

Read more:
https://airandspace.si.edu/multimedia-gallery/4857640jpg https://www.asme.org/

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Lunar Equipment Conveyor Waist Tether Kit
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Lunar Equipment Conveyor (LEC)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: A method for transferring cargo and equipment in and out of the Lunar Module Ascent Stage.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Per NASA: The LEC was a flat, woven strap about one inch (2.5 cm) wide. There was a “snap hook” (or, simply, a ‘hook’) at each end. Initially, the LMP kept the hooks in the cabin. A simple pulley—a metal tube cut slightly longer than the strap width—with two metal hooks attached was used to secure the LEC to a yellow handgrip (aka PLSS Upper Mounting Station Pin) in a recess in the cabin ceiling. Midway along the strap between the two hooks, a separate, short loop was attached to the main strap, possibly as a handle for the astronaut’s use when he took the LEC outside and almost certainly as a marker for the midpoint.

Read more:
https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/alsj-lec.html

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Bag for Lunar Equipment Conveyor (LEC)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Housing for Lunar Equipment Conveyor, a method for transferring cargo and equipment in and out of the Lunar Module Ascent Stage.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Per NASA: The LEC was a flat, woven strap about one inch (2.5 cm) wide. There was a “snap hook” (or, simply, a ‘hook’) at each end. Initially, the LMP kept the hooks in the cabin. A simple pulley – a metal tube cut slightly longer than the strap width – with two metal hooks attached was used to secure the LEC to a yellow handgrip (aka PLSS Upper Mounting Station Pin) in a recess in the cabin ceiling. Midway along the strap between the two hooks, a separate, short loop was attached to the main strap, possibly as a handle for the astronaut’s use when he took the LEC outside and almost certainly as a marker for the midpoint.

Read more:
https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/alsj-lec.html

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Insulating Blanket
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, time to be inserted
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

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The Apollo 10 mission encompassed all aspects of an actual crewed lunar landing, except the landing. It was the first to operate around the Moon. Objectives included a scheduled eight-hour lunar orbit of the separated lunar module, or LM, and descent to about nine miles off the Moon's surface before
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