Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Adapter, SRC/OPS
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Interim Stowage Assembly
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Small Urine Collection Assembly
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: Left on Moon at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Liquid waste (urine) collection.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Liquid waste (urine) was collected in the device, which astronauts attached to themselves using roll-on cuffs to provide sanitary protection. The urine was then transferred through the metal transfer tube to a tank, from which the majority of liquid waste was vented into space. A small portion was freeze-dried and stored for testing upon return to Earth. (National Air and Space Museum)

Read more:
https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/collection-and-transfer-assembly-urine-apollo-11

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Emesis Bag
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: Left on Moon at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Bags intended to capture vomit.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The emesis bag was designed to permit for hygienic disposal of vomit. The emesis bags left on the Moon were empty. According to Biomedical Results of Apollo, the official published post-program report by the Apollo program physicians, while astronauts have vomited in space, none have done so on a lunar landing mission. The unlucky astronauts are Frank Borman (twice from stomach flu) of Apollo 8, Russell Schweickart (twice from motion sickness) of Apollo 9, and Fred Haise (once from an unknown virus) of Apollo 13.

Read more:
https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2014/11/moon-puke-lunar-vomit.html

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Disposal Container Assembly
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: Left on Moon at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: PLSS Condensate Container
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: Left on Moon at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Container for condensate from the Portable Life Support System.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Portable life support system feedwater-collection bag. The PLSS feedwater collection bag is used by the crewmen in the LM to determine the amount of feedwater remaining in the PLSS after EVA. This procedure permits measurement of the crews’ metabolic rate during EVA.

The PLSS feedwater-collection device is constructed of an inner and an outer bag. The inner bag is made of rubberized cloth, and the outer bag, which is used as a restraining cover, is made of Nomex. A vehicle recharge connector, which is attached to the open end of the bags, mates directly with the PLSS to receive the PLSS feedwater. A water-fill connector is attached by a pushbutton indicator lanyard to the vehicle recharge connector to vent the bag when it is not in use.

To determine the amount of water consumption, the PLSS feedwater-collection bag is weighed after termination of lunar-surface operation. The scale used to accomplish the weighing is a standard spring-loaded scale that can be adjusted to obtain the weights of objects on the lunar surface. When not in use, this scale is stored in a sized pocket on the restraint layer of the bag. The bag and scale were used successfully on the Apollo 11 mission.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: S-Band Antenna
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Communication link to Earth.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Launch, in-space operation, and re-entry, of any spacecraft require tightly coordinated actions on the ground and on the spacecraft. Information must be passed both ways, and use radio links to accomplish it all. Voice communications connect the people involved: covering the moment to moment status of the flight, experiences and decision making that are part of manned spaceflight.

Data communications carry data from spacecraft elctrical, guidance, life support, and other systems back to earth, while comand and control data are sent to the spacecraft for the purpose of updating spacecraft systems with essential data, configuring the spacecraft apropriately for its phase of flight, and accomplishing various tasks that are impractical or unsafe for astronauts to attempt.

Note that the communications infrastructure evolved from what was used for aircraft flight testing into a whole new and much more complex system to support missions in low earth orbit, and then extended range missions to the moon.

The Mercury and Gemini programs, used a growing kludge of radio systems on VHF and UHF for voice and telemetry. Tracking was accomplished by use of a C band transponder, similar in function to a basic aircraft mode A transponder, which was interrogated by a ground based radar. There were too many different radios, cables, antennas, power supplies, and other equipment in the old system for trips to the moon. Reliability, range, and bandwidth had to be increased; weight, power consumption, and size had to be reduced. Apollo also would include something entirely new in the space program: live television from the astronauts. Therefore, the new space telecommunications system needed to be highly innovative to meet the needs of the ambitious Apollo program.

It was decided that the new Unified S Band System, built by the Collins Radio Company, would incorporate multiple signals onto one uplink from the ground and one downlink per spacecraft.

The technnology grew out of the coherent doppler and the pseudo-random range tracking system which was being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Subcarriers for voice and telemetry were added to the tracking signal in a manner that would allow each to function without interference from the others.

It was an elegant and very capable solution for the communications challenges posed by manned flight to lunar distances. At any time during a mission, one tracking station in view of the spacecraft, with one high gain antenna could provide tracking, command, and communications services. Using the huge parabolic antennas of the Deep Space Network and smaller antennas of the Apollo / Crewed Space Flight Network, constant high quality contact would be maintained with Apollo spacecraft.

Read more:
https://www.ab9il.net/aviation/apollo-s-band.html

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: TV Tripod
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Strap for ECS LIOH Canister
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: The lithium hydroxide canister was designed to maintain a pure-oxygen environment within the Apollo spacecraft by filtering out carbon dioxide, odors, and debris. The LiOH within the canister absorbed carbon dioxide, and carbon in the form of charcoal eliminated odors. The circulation within the spacecraft also carried debris to the canister, trapping it in the filter.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The lithium hydroxide canister was designed as a replaceable filter for the environmental control unit (ECU). The ECU provided cooling, water and breathable oxygen for the astronauts’ suits and cabin. Two canisters were present in the oxygen system at all times and were alternately replaced, one every twelve hours. To maintain a safe pure-oxygen environment, the canisters contained lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and charcoal and were covered by a felt cloth barrier. The LiOH within the canister absorbed carbon dioxide, the charcoal eliminated odors, and the felt trapped particles and debris.

Read more:
https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/lithium-hydroxide-canister-command-module-apollo-11-0

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Bag for Camera Mount Bracket
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Hammock Assembly
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Assist astronauts during rest periods.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Based on the experience of the Apollo 11 astronauts, who spent their rest periods on the lunar module floor, hammocks designed to attach to the interior of the LM ascent stage were provided for the lunar module astronauts from Apollo 12 on. Made of beta cloth and adjustable with straps, the hammocks helped reduce the cooling effects of contact with the cabin floor (the Apollo 11 astronauts had reported being too cold to sleep comfortably) as well as a softer support.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Bracket, Installation Color TV Camera
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Suggested
Suggested contents and articles.
Suggested Contents
Apollo 13: Crewed Lunar Landing
The Apollo 13 lunar landing was aborted after an oxygen tank in the service module failed two days into the mission. The story of Apollo 13 is an enduring tale of survival, perseverance and innovation in the face of emergency.
Apollo 11: Crewed Lunar Landing
The primary objective of Apollo 11 was to complete a national goal set by President John F. Kennedy on May 25, 1961: perform a crewed lunar landing and return to Earth.
Apollo 10: Crewed Lunar Orbit
The Apollo 10 mission encompassed all aspects of an actual crewed lunar landing, except the landing. It was the first to operate around the Moon. Objectives included a scheduled eight-hour lunar orbit of the separated lunar module, or LM, and descent to about nine miles off the Moon's surface before
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