Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Contrast Target
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Color Chart
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: LS Magnetometer Experiment
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Passive Seismic Experiment
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: The Passive Seismic Experiment detected lunar “moonquakes” and provided information about the internal structure of the Moon.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Per NASA: The Passive Seismic Experiment studied the propagation of seismic waves through the Moon and provided our most detailed look at the Moon’s internal structure. The Apollo 11 seismometer returned data for just three weeks but provided a useful first look at lunar seismology. More advanced seismometers were deployed at the Apollo 12, 14, 15, and 16 landing sites and transmitted data to Earth until September 1977. Each of these seismometers measured all three components of ground displacement (up-down, north-south, and east-west).

Read more:
https://www.lpi.usra.edu/lunar/missions/apollo/apollo_12/experiments/pse/index.shtml

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Solar Wind Experiment
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Study solar wind.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The Solar Wind Composition Experiment was performed on Apollo 11, 12, 14, 15, and 16. It consisted of an aluminum foil sheet, 1.4 meters by 0.3 meters, that was deployed on a pole facing the Sun. On Apollo 16, a platinum sheet was also used.

This foil was exposed to the Sun for periods ranging from 77 minutes on Apollo 11 to 45 hours on Apollo 16, allowing solar wind particles to embed themselves into the foil. The foil was then returned to Earth for laboratory analysis. This allowed the chemical composition of the embedded solar wind to be determined more accurately than would be possible if the measurement were made using remotely controlled instruments on the Moon, but limited the periods at which observations could be made.

The isotopes of the light noble gases were measured, including helium-3, helium-4, neon-20, neon-21, neon-22, and argon-36. Some variation in the composition of the solar wind was observed in the measurements from the different missions. These variations were correlated with variations in the intensity of the solar wind as determined from magnetic field measurements.

The Solar Wind Composition experiment on Apollo 12 was the same as the experiment flown on Apollo 11. The experiment was deployed on the lunar surface and was exposed to the solar wind for 18 hours and 42 minutes. Afterward, the foil was removed and placed in a Teflon bag and returned to Earth for analysis.

Read more:
https://www.lpi.usra.edu/lunar/missions/apollo/apollo_12/surface_opp/

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Expo
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: To provide electricity to operate scientific instruments and subsystems.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The nuclear assembly was carried on the outside of the lunar module on its journey to the moon. This allowed the heat generated by the fuel capsule to be dispersed in space and for adequate shielding to protect the astronauts. The power was provided by SNAP-27, one of a series of radioisotope thermoelectric generators, or atomic batteries, developed by the Atomic Energy Commission.

The SNAP (Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power) programme is directed at development of generators and reactors for use in space, on land and in die sea. While nuclear heaters were used in the seismometer package on Apollo 11, SNAP-2 7 on Apollo 12 marked the first use of a nuclear electrical power system on the Moon. It was designed to provide all the electricity for continuous one-year operation of the scientific instruments and supporting subsystems deployed by the astronauts on the lunar surface.

Read more:
https://www.iaea.org/sites/default/files/publications/magazines/bulletin/

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: (e) Subthermal Ion Detector/COGE Expo
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: PSE Leveling Tool
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Stabilize the Portable Seismometer Experiment.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Hand Tool Carrier
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: To assist with obtaining samples.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Filter, polarizing
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: (a) Bag, assembly, Lec+ Wt. *303
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 14 November 1969, 16:22:00 UT
Landing Date: 19 November 1969, 06:54:35 UT
Deployment: 19 November 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Suggested
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The Apollo 13 lunar landing was aborted after an oxygen tank in the service module failed two days into the mission. The story of Apollo 13 is an enduring tale of survival, perseverance and innovation in the face of emergency.
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The primary objective of Apollo 11 was to complete a national goal set by President John F. Kennedy on May 25, 1961: perform a crewed lunar landing and return to Earth.
Apollo 10: Crewed Lunar Orbit
The Apollo 10 mission encompassed all aspects of an actual crewed lunar landing, except the landing. It was the first to operate around the Moon. Objectives included a scheduled eight-hour lunar orbit of the separated lunar module, or LM, and descent to about nine miles off the Moon's surface before
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