United States — NASA
Apollo 11: Crewed Lunar Landing

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Hasselblad Data Camera
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Take photographs.
Image Sources: NASA and Hasselblad

Description

A silver Hasselblad Data Camera (HDC) with Réseau plate, fitted with a Zeiss Biogon 60mm ƒ/5.6 lens, was chosen to document the lunar surface and attached to astronaut Armstrong’s chest.

This electrically powered camera, carried on the lunar module, featured semiautomatic operation. It used 60-mm Biogon lens exclusively. The operating sequence was initiated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. A reseau grid was set in front of the image plane to provide photogrammetric information in the analysis of the photography. The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of an astronaut’s suit.

Working perfectly under the extreme conditions of the lunar surface, the HDC produced some of history’s most iconic photographs. After the successful shooting on 21 July 1969, the Hasselblad was hoisted up to the lunar lander with a line. Securely removing the film magazines, both cameras with lenses were left behind on the Moon in order to meet narrow weight margins for successful return.
The journeys home from the Moon made very special demands on what could return regarding weight; from Apollo 11 to the final Apollo 17 mission, a total of twelve camera bodies were left behind on the lunar surface.

Only the film magazines containing the momentous images were brought back. The resulting photographs captured the history of humanity in the making.

Read more:
https://www.hasselblad.com/history/hasselblad-in-space/
https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a11/a11-hass.html

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide Angle Cameras
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Take photographs.
Image Sources: NASA and Hasselblad

Description

These cameras, which were carried aboard the lunar module, were operated manually for the shutter and film advance.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Lunar Surface Close-up Steroscopic Camera
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Take photographs.
Image Source: NASA

Description

This camera, carried on the lunar module’s Modular Equipment Storage Assembly (MESA), was designed for the highest possible resolution of a 3-inch square area with a flash illumination and fixed distance. Photography was accomplished by holding the camera on a walking stick against the object to be photographed. The camera was powered by four nickel-cadmium batteries that operated the motor-drive mechanism and an electronic flash strobe light.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Solar Wind Composition Staff
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Study solar wind.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The Sun continually emits a flux of electrically charged particles into space. This is termed the solar wind. The Earth’s magnetic field prevents these charged particles from reaching the Earth’s surface, although in the Earth’s polar regions, these particles can reach the upper part of the atmosphere, causing auroras. The Moon is outside the Earth’s magnetic field for most of each month and has a negligible atmosphere, allowing solar-wind particles to reach the Moon’s surface. The Solar Wind Composition Experiment was deployed on the Moon to study the solar wind.

The Solar Wind Composition Experiment was performed on Apollo 11, 12, 14, 15, and 16. It consisted of an aluminum foil sheet, 1.4 meters by 0.3 meters, that was deployed on a pole facing the sun. On Apollo 16, a platinum sheet was also used. This foil was exposed to the sun for periods ranging from 77 minutes on Apollo 11 to 45 hours on Apollo 16, allowing solar-wind particles to embed themselves into the foil. The foil was then returned to Earth for laboratory analysis.

This allowed the chemical composition of the embedded solar wind to be determined more accurately than would be possible if the measurement were made using remotely controlled instruments on the Moon, but limited the periods at which observations could be made. The isotopes of the light noble gases were measured, including helium-3, helium-4, neon-20, neon-21, neon-22, and argon-36. Some variation in the composition of the solar wind was observed in the measurements from the different mission. These variations were correlated with variations in the intensity of the solar wind as determined from magnetic field measurements.

The staff remained on the Moon.

Read more:
https://www.lpi.usra.edu/lunar/missions/apollo/apollo_11/experiments/swc/

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Arm rests (four on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Nonessential.
Image Sources: NASA and University of Oregon

Description

NASA wanted the mission to bring back as many samples of lunar rocks and dust as possible, which meant the crew needed to leave behind everything they didn’t actually need for the trip back to Earth.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Handle of Contingency Lunar Sample Return Container
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Secure samples.
Image Sources: NASA and Air and Space Museum Smithsonian Institute

Description

As the first priority, a sample of lunar surface material was collected and stored on the spacecraft to ensure that, if an early end to the surface activities were required, samples from the Moon could be returned to Earth. This sample was collected immediately northwest of the lunar module and its collection took about 3.5 minutes.

The Apollo Lunar Sample Return Container (ALSRC) was an aluminum box with a triple seal manufactured by the Nuclear Division of Union Carbide. It was used on Apollo lunar landing missions to preserve a lunar-like vacuum around the samples and protect them from the shock environment of the return flight to earth. An aluminum mesh liner helped absorb impacts. Prior to flight, each box was loaded with sample container bags and other sample containment devices. The “rock box” was then closed under vacuum so that it would not contain pressure greater than the lunar ambient pressure.

On the moon, while samples were being loaded, the seals were protected by a Teflon film and a cloth cover which were removed just prior to closing the box. Two ALSRC’s were used on each mission.

The ALSRC was returned to Earth, but the handle left behind. The ALSRC used in July 1969 during Apollo 11 was opened under controlled conditions in the Lunar Receiving Laboratory at the Houston Manned Space Center. It carried 21.8 kg (47.7 lbs) of lunar material from the Sea of Tranquility.

Read more:
https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/alsrc-apollo-lunar-sample-return-container-apollo-11

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Small Scoop
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Secure samples.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Trenching Tool
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Secure samples.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Mesa Bracket
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Secure samples.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Document Sample Box Seal
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Secure samples.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Film Magazines (two sets left on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Secure samples.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Storage Container Empty
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Secure samples.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

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The Apollo 10 mission encompassed all aspects of an actual crewed lunar landing, except the landing. It was the first to operate around the Moon. Objectives included a scheduled eight-hour lunar orbit of the separated lunar module, or LM, and descent to about nine miles off the Moon's surface before
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