United States — NASA
Apollo 11: Crewed Lunar Landing

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Tripod
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Experiments.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Handle/Cable Assembly for Television Camera
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: The Lunar Television Camera was designed to operate either in the spacecraft or on the lunar surface with no adjustments except for lens changes.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The black and white television camera was made by Westinghouse and used to transmit images of astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin. Stored in the Modularized Equipment Stowage Assembly (MESA) of the Eagle lunar module (LM), the camera was deployed by Armstrong before he climbed down the ladder of the LM and transmitted this historic moment back to Earth. After the astronauts were on the lunar surface, they placed the camera away from the LM to record their activities. The original camera is still on the Moon.

Read more:
https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/WEC-Engineer-3-1968.pdf
https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/camera-television-lunar-surface-apollo

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: York Mesh Packing Material
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Packing material
Image Source: NASA

Description

York mesh lined the sample return containers and acted as packing pads. They dampened the vibration and shock to samples during the return flight. The unused material was jettisoned in order to lighten the weight of the ascent stage for the return.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: SWC Bag (extra)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Measure solar wind.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The Sun continually emits a flux of electrically charged particles into space. This is termed the solar wind. The Earth’s magnetic field prevents these charged particles from reaching the Earth’s surface, although in the Earth’s polar regions, these particles can reach the upper part of the atmosphere, causing auroras. The Moon is outside the Earth’s magnetic field for most of each month and has a negligible atmosphere, allowing solar-wind particles to reach the Moon’s surface. The Solar Wind Composition Experiment was deployed on the Moon to study the solar wind.

The Solar Wind Composition Experiment was performed on Apollo 11, 12, 14, 15, and 16. It consisted of an aluminum foil sheet, 1.4 meters by 0.3 meters, that was deployed on a pole facing the sun. On Apollo 16, a platinum sheet was also used. This foil was exposed to the sun for periods ranging from 77 minutes on Apollo 11 to 45 hours on Apollo 16, allowing solar-wind particles to embed themselves into the foil. The foil was then returned to Earth for laboratory analysis. The bag and other items related to the experiment remained on the Moon.

Read more:
https://www.lpi.usra.edu/lunar/missions/apollo/apollo_11/experiments/swc/

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Core Tube Bits (two left on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Obtain samples.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Core tubes were used to obtain continuous soil solumns down to 70 cm in depth. The core tube was a thick-walled, small diameter tube. Each core tube had a bit on one end and an adapter screw on the other end. The astronaut attached an extension handle to the adapter, placed the core tube on the soil, and drove it in by hitting the top of the handle with a hammer. Once pulled from the soil, the bit was replaced by a cap. Two tubes could be screwed together to make a longer tube.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Environment Sample Containers “O” Rings (two left on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site
Object

Object Name: Sample Return Container Seal Protectors (two left on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Secure samples.
N/A
Image Sources: NASA and Air and Space Museum Smithsonian Institute

Description

The Apollo Lunar Sample Return Container (ALSRC) was an aluminum box with a triple seal manufactured by the Nuclear Division of Union Carbide. It was used on Apollo lunar landing missions to preserve a lunar-like vacuum around the samples and protect them from the shock environment of the return flight to earth. An aluminum mesh liner helped absorb impacts.

Prior to flight, each box was loaded with sample container bags and other sample containment devices. The “rock box” was then closed under vacuum so that it would not contain pressure greater than the lunar ambient pressure. On the Moon, while samples were being loaded, the seals were protected by a Teflon film and a cloth cover which were removed just prior to closing the box. Two ALSRC’s were used on each mission.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: ESC Bracket
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: OPS Brackets (two left on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Stainless Steel Cover
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Left Hand Side Stowage Compartment
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Insulating Blanket
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Suggested
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Suggested Contents
Apollo 17: Crewed Lunar Landing
Scientific objectives of the Apollo 17 mission included, geological surveying and sampling of materials and surface features in a preselected area of the Taurus-Littrow region; deploying and activating surface experiments; and conducting in-flight experiments and photographic tasks during lunar orbit and transearth coast.
Apollo 12: Crewed Lunar Landing
The primary mission objectives of the second crewed lunar landing included an extensive series of lunar exploration tasks by the lunar module, or LM, crew, as well as the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package, or ALSEP, which was to be left on the moon's surface to gather
Apollo 10: Crewed Lunar Orbit
The Apollo 10 mission encompassed all aspects of an actual crewed lunar landing, except the landing. It was the first to operate around the Moon. Objectives included a scheduled eight-hour lunar orbit of the separated lunar module, or LM, and descent to about nine miles off the Moon's surface before
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