United States — NASA
Apollo 11: Crewed Lunar Landing

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Small Aluminum Capsule
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 21 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Passive Seismic Experiment
Cospar: 1969-059C-03
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: 25 August 1969, [time to be inserted]
Function: The Passive Seismic Experiment detected lunar “moonquakes” and provided information about the internal structure of the Moon.
Image Sources: NASA and Air and Space Museum Smithsonian Institute

Description

Per NASA: The instrument consisted of a seismometer designed to detect moonquakes and impacts. It was considered part of the EASEP on A-11.

It contained three long-period seismometers with resonant periods of ~15 seconds, aligned orthogonally to measure surface motion in three dimensions, and a single-axis, short-period seismometer sensitive to vertical motion at higher frequencies (resonant period of ~1 sec.) On later ALSEPs, the single vertical sensor frequency was 0.05 to 10 Hz and the 3 orthogonal sensors were sensitive to 0.004 to 3 Hz.

It sat on a mounting stool, which raised the unit off the surface. A Mylar skirt surrounded the unit to reduce thermally induced tilts of the local surface around the apparatus. The A-11 instrument was powered by solar panels, the rest by the ALSEP RTG.

Read more:
https://www.lpi.usra.edu/lunar/missions/apollo/apollo_11/experiments/pse/
https://www.lpi.usra.edu/lunar/missions/apollo/Sullivan_NASA-RP-1994-1317_ApolloExperimentOperations.pdf

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Gold Olive Branch
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: This small gold replica of an olive branch, a traditional symbol of peace, was placed on the lunar surface to represent a wish for peace for all humankind.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Gold pennant, less than six inches in length.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Flag Kit
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: -00.57,023.49 E
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: The placement of the flag of the United States on the Moon was strictly a symbolic activity, as the Outer Space Treaty precludes any sovereign claim over territory in space or on any celestial body other than Earth.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The flag-raising offered an interesting technical challenge in that the flag had to “fly” without wind. Other factors considered in the design were weight, heat resistance, and ease of assembly by astronauts whose space suits restricted their range of movement and ability to grasp items.

The flag kit had three parts. There are two vertical sections, and a horizontal crossbar that’s hinged at the top of the upper vertical section. To deploy the flag, one astronaut used a sampling hammer to pound the lower vertical section into the ground. The other astronaut extended the telescoping crossbar and raised it to a 90-degree angle with the vertical section to click it into place. Then the two astronauts slid the upper part of the pole into the lower one.

Read more:
https://historycollection.jsc.nasa.gov/JSCHistoryPortal/history/flag/flag.htm

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Apollo 1 Patch
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: The Apollo 1 Patch was placed on the Moon to pay tribute to the crew of Apollo 1: Gus Grissom, Roger Chafee and Ed White, who perished in a fire during a launch rehearsal.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The Patch depicts a command and service module flying over the southeastern United States. The Moon is seen in the distance, symbolic of the overall mission of the Apollo program. A yellow border carries the mission and astronaut names with another border set with stars and stripes, trimmed in gold. The insignia was designed by the crew, with the artwork done by North American Aviation employee Allen Stevens.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Cosmonaut Medals
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Symbolic
Image Source: NASA

Description

The Cosmonaut Medals were given to astronaut Frank Borman by the widows of Yuri Gagarin and Vladimiry Komarov who perished while participating in space programs in the Soviet Union. The Medals were left on the Moon to commemorate their sacrifice.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Lunar Module Eagle (Ascent Stage)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Unkown
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: N/A
End Date: N/A
Function: Per the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum: “The Lunar Module (LM) was used for descent to the lunar surface and served as a base while the astronauts were on the Moon. A separate ascent stage, comprising the top portion of the Lunar Module, lifted the astronauts from the Moon’s surface to rendezvous and dock with the command module, orbiting the Moon.”
Image Source: NASA

Description

Per the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, the lunar module had two stages:A silver-and-black ascent stage, containing the crew’s pressurized compartment and the clusters of rockets that controlled the spacecraft

1. A gold-and-black descent stage, similar to the ascent stage, containing a main, centrally located rocket engine and tanks of fuel and oxidizer.

2. The descent (lower) stage was equipped with a rocket motor to slow the rate of descent to the lunar surface. It contained exploration equipment and remained on the Moon when the astronauts left. The ascent (upper) stage contained the crew compartment and a rocket motor to return the astronauts to the orbiting command module. After the crew entered the command module for the trip back to Earth, the lunar module was released and eventually crashed into the Moon.

To rejoin the command module, the astronauts fired the ascent-stage rocket engine and lifted off, leaving the descent stage on the Moon. The ascent stage met and docked with the command module in lunar orbit. The ascent stage then was programmed to crash into the Moon.

Read more:
https://airandspace.si.edu/exhibitions/apollo-to-the-moon/online/apollo-11/about-the-spacecraft.cfm

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Laser Range Reflector
Cospar: 1969-059C-04
Norad: N/A
Location: 0.67337 ̊ N, 23.47293 ̊ E
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: Present
Function: The lunar laser ranging experiment, it studies the Earth-Moon system and returns data to scientific centers around the world, including NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
Image Sources: NASA and Air and Space Museum Smithsonian Institute

Description

Per JPL: The experiment consists of an instrument called the lunar laser ranging reflector, designed to reflect pulses of laser light fired from the Earth. The idea was to determine the round-trip travel time of a laser pulse from the Earth to the Moon and back again, thereby calculating the distance between the two bodies to unprecedented accuracy.

Unlike the other scientific experiments left on the Moon, this reflector requires no power and is still functioning perfectly after 35 years. The Apollo 11 laser reflector consists of 100 fused silica half cubes, called corner cubes, mounted in a 46-centimeter (18-inch) square aluminum panel. Each corner cube is 3.8 centimeters (1.5 inches) in diameter. Corner cubes reflect a beam of light directly back toward its point of origin; it is this fact that also makes them so useful in Earth surveying.

Read more:
https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=605

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Plaque
Cospar: 1969-059C
Norad: N/A
Location: 0.67408 ̊ N, 23.47297 ̊ E
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: N/A
End Date: N/A
Function: The Apollo 11 astronauts left a plaque on the Moon in commemoration of the historic lunar landing mission. The plaque was attached to the ladder on the landing gear strut on the descent stage of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module (LM). The plaque was covered with a thin sheet of stainless steel during flight. Astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander, and Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, explored the moon.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The Apollo 11 astronauts left a plaque on the Moon in commemoration of the historic lunar landing mission. The plaque was attached to the ladder on the landing gear strut on the descent stage of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module (LM). The plaque was covered with a thin sheet of stainless steel during flight. Astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander, and Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, explored the moon. The plaque says: “Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the moon, July 1969 A.D. We came in peace for all mankind.”(NSSDCA)

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Filter, Polarizing
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: N/A
End Date: N/A
Function: The polarizing filter designed for the camera is designed to suppress glare.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Portable Life Support Systems (PLSS) (two left on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: The Apollo spacesuit’s Life Support System (LSS) backpack consisted of the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) and the Oxygen Purge System (OPS). The PLSS provided life support to the astronaut during normal lunar surface EVA (extravehicular activity). The PLSS pressurized the suit, supplied breathing oxygen, removed carbon dioxide, particulates and odors, provided cooling, and controlled humidity within safe and comfortable limits. In case the PLSS failed, the OPS provided emergency life support while the astronaut retreated to safety of the LM (lunar module). It was a simple, purge-flow unit located on top of the PLSS.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The PLSS unit weighed approximately 84 pounds and supplied enough air for four hours on the surface. Seismic sensors left on the surface by the astronauts recorded the thumps of the PLSS gear hitting the lunar sruface when jettisoned by the astronauts. In fact, Mission Control radioed: “We observed your equipment jettison on the TV, and the passive seismic experiment recorded shocks when each PLSS hit the surface.” Armstrong responded, “You can’t get away with anything anymore, can you?”

Read more:
https://www.airspacemag.com/need-to-know/how-did-the-apollo-astronauts-toss-their-spacesuits-overboard-15214768/#VvXlFOyJcfC1ZIhO.99

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Remote Control Units for PLSS (two left on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: The Remote Control Unit was worn on the front of the spacesuit and was connected to the Portable Life Support System (PLSS). It provided the astronaut with the ability to monitor the life support systems and adjust the controls of the PLSS.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Per NASA: The Remote Control Unit was a component of the total Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit system, which also included the Portable Life Support System (PLSS), Oxygen Purge System (OPS), and the suit itself. The system was added to the EMU after the redesign following the Apollo 1 accident. Mounted on the chest of the EMU, the system provided simple controls for communications and some EMU functions, as well as warnings and indicators for EMU status. It had a secondary function as a mounting for the standard Apollo Hasselblad camera and Oxygen Purge System actuator.

Read more:
https://www.si.edu/es/object/nasm_A19830158000?width=85%25&height=85%25&iframe=true&destination=spotlight/human-spaceflight
https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/alsj-RCU.html

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