United States — NASA
Apollo 11: Crewed Lunar Landing

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Defecation Collection Device (Four left on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function, per NASA: The Apollo fecal-collection system consisted of the fecal-collection assembly (FCA) on the CM and the defecation-collection device (DCD) on the LM. The design and operation of the DCD are similar to the design and operation of the FCA. The FCA provides and proceeds with fecal elimination. Upon completion of the action and subsequent sanitary cleansing, the tissues and refuse are placed in the inner fecal/emesis bag. The crewman then removes the germicide pouch, cuts the outer protective seal, and places it in the inner bag. Finally, all items are placed into the outer fecal bag, the bag is sealed, the germicide pouch is ruptured by hand pressure, the bag is kneaded, and the contents are stowed in the waste-stowage compartment.
Image Sources: NASA and Air and Space Museum Smithsonian Institution

Description

“The system is self-contained, giving the astronaut flexibility and control in a weightless environment, and allows for a simple and hygienic disposal. The paper on the round end was removed to expose an adhesive portion that astronauts could affix to themselves and use to seal the bag after use. A germicidal tablet was then activated inside the bag to kill bacteria and the bag was placed in a containment bag for storage and disposal.”

Read more:
https://airandspace.si.edu/node/33242

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Lunar Overshoes (two pairs left on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: The lunar overboot was designed to give astronauts thermal and abrasion protection, as well as extra traction in the slippery lunar dust.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The Apollo 11 mission was the first crewed landing. Both Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin spent a total of 2 hours and 32 minutes walking on the lunar surface as they tried out the suits and other equipment while gathering rock samples to bring back to geologists. Armstrong reported that moving around on the Moon’s surface was perhaps easier than the simulations on Earth.

Per Air and Space Musuem Smithsonian Institute: The overshoes were designed to be worn over the Apollo spacesuit boots while an astronaut was walking on the Moon. The International Latex Corporation made the overshoes which were worn over the boots that were integrated into the spacesuit and which included the pressure bladder and thermal coverings. The boots were made with a silicone sole, woven stainless steel upper (Chromel-R), and included additional layers of thermal protection and beta felt in the soles as protection against extreme temperatures and sharp rocks on the lunar surface.

Read more:
http://www.ninfinger.org/karld/My%20Space%20Museum/bootglove.htm
https://airandspace.si.edu/multimedia-gallery/4857640jpg
https://www.asme.org/wwwasmeorg/media/resourcefiles/aboutasme/who%20we%20are/engineering%20history/landmarks/apollobr.pdf

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Pressure Garment Assembly Gas Connector Covers (two left on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: The major component of the astronaut’s spacesuit is called the Pressure Garment Assembly (PGA). When not in use or in storage, connectors were protected by covers.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The Pressure Garment Assembly provides a mobile life support chamber that can be pressurized separately from the cabin inner structure in case of a leak or puncture. The PGA consists of a helmet, gloves and torso and limb assembly. It requires an oxygen hose for oxygen and an electrical cable for telecommunications.

Read more:
https://history.nasa.gov/afj/aoh/aoh-v1-2-12-crew.pdf

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Lunar Equipment Conveyor Waist Tether Kit
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Lunar Equipment Conveyor (LEC)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: A method for transferring cargo and equipment in and out of the Lunar Module Ascent Stage.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Per NASA: The LEC was a flat, woven strap about one inch (2.5 cm) wide. There was a “snap hook” (or, simply, a ‘hook’) at each end. Initially, the LMP kept the hooks in the cabin. A simple pulley—a metal tube cut slightly longer than the strap width—with two metal hooks attached was used to secure the LEC to a yellow handgrip (aka PLSS Upper Mounting Station Pin) in a recess in the cabin ceiling. Midway along the strap between the two hooks, a separate, short loop was attached to the main strap, possibly as a handle for the astronaut’s use when he took the LEC outside and almost certainly as a marker for the midpoint.

Read more:
https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/alsj-lec.html

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Bag, Deployment, Life Line
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Bag for Lunar Equipment Conveyor (LEC)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: N/A
Image Source: NASA

Description

Per NASA: The LEC was a flat, woven strap about one inch (2.5 cm) wide. There was a “snap hook” (or, simply, a ‘hook’) at each end. A simple pulley—a metal tube cut slightly longer than the strap width—with two metal hooks attached was used to secure the LEC to a yellow handgrip (aka PLSS Upper Mounting Station Pin) in a recess in the cabin ceiling. Midway along the strap between the two hooks, a separate, short loop was attached to the main strap, possibly as a handle for the astronaut’s use when he took the LEC outside and almost certainly as a marker for the midpoint.

Read more:
https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/alsj-lec.html

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Life Line, lightweight
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Lunar Equipment Conveyor Waist Tether for Extra Vehicular Activity
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Neil Armstrong used a safety tether attached to his waist when he made his initial descent from the Ascent Stage, down the ladder and onto the lunar surface.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Per NASA: The LEC was a flat, woven strap about one inch (2.5 cm) wide. There was a “snap hook” (or, simply, a ‘hook’) at each end. Initially, the LMP kept the hooks in the cabin. A simple pulley—a metal tube cut slightly longer than the strap width—with two metal hooks attached was used to secure the LEC to a yellow handgrip (aka PLSS Upper Mounting Station Pin) in a recess in the cabin ceiling. Midway along the strap between the two hooks, a separate, short loop was attached to the main strap, possibly as a handle for the astronaut’s use when he took the LEC outside and almost certainly as a marker for the midpoint.

Read more:
https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a11/a11tether.html

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Food Assembly (4 crew days), Beef and Vegetables
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Nourishment for astronauts.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Apollo astronauts were the first to have hot water and eat their packaged food with a spoon. While on board Apollo 11, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were reportedly served beef and vegetables, pork with potato scallops, and Canadian bacon and apple sauce — all out of a package. The meals were color-coded, individually wrapped, and labeled for each day. If something went wrong, such as the cabin losing pressure, the astronauts had a back-up food source that would feed them through a port in their helmet, ensuring they wouldn’t have to take off their suits.

Read more:
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19740020236.pdf

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Food Assembly (4 crew days), Day 3 Meal
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Nourishment for astronauts.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Apollo astronauts were the first to have hot water and eat their packaged food with a spoon. While on board Apollo 11, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were reportedly served beef and vegetables, pork with potato scallops, and Canadian bacon and apple sauce — all out of a package. The meals were color-coded, individually wrapped, and labeled for each day. If something went wrong, such as the cabin losing pressure, the astronauts had a back-up food source that would feed them through a port in their helmet, ensuring they wouldn’t have to take off their suits.

Read more:
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19740020236.pdf

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Food Assembly (4 crew days), Peaches
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Nourishment for astronauts.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Apollo astronauts were the first to have hot water and eat their packaged food with a spoon. While on board Apollo 11, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were reportedly served beef and vegetables, pork with potato scallops, and Canadian bacon and apple sauce — all out of a package. The meals were color-coded, individually wrapped, and labeled for each day. If something went wrong, such as the cabin losing pressure, the astronauts had a back-up food source that would feed them through a port in their helmet, ensuring they wouldn’t have to take off their suits.

Read more:
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19740020236.pdf

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