United States — NASA
Apollo 11: Crewed Lunar Landing

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: TV Subsystem
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: Telecommunications included voice, television, data and tracking and ranging subsystems.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Lunar Television Camera
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: 21 July 1969, [time to be inserted]
End Date: N/A
Function: The Lunar Television Camera was designed to operate either in the spacecraft or on the lunar surface with no adjustments except for lens changes.
Image Sources: NASA and Air and Space Museum Smithsonian Institute

Description

The black and white television camera was made by Westinghouse and used to transmit images of astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin. Stored in the Modularized Equipment Stowage Assembly (MESA) of the Eagle lunar module (LM), the camera was deployed by Armstrong before he climbed down the ladder of the LM and transmitted this historic moment back to Earth. After the astronauts were on the lunar surface, they placed the camera away from the LM to record their activities. The original camera is still on the Moon.

Read more:
https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/WEC-Engineer-3-1968.pdf
https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/camera-television-lunar-surface-apollo

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Wide Angle Television Lens
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Left on Moon at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: The Lunar Television Camera was designed to operate either in the spacecraft or on the lunar surface with no adjustments except for lens changes. Lenses were all quick disconnect types so that they could be handled by an astronaut in a spacesuit.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Maintaining optical focus for all lenses under all environmental conditions required careful selection of mounting materials and methods. For example, the lenses were mounted directly to the tube assembly rather than to the camera case, which permits closer mouting tolerances to be maintainted.

Read more:
https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/WEC-Engineer-3-1968.pdf

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Wide Angle Television Lens
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Left on Moon at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: The Lunar Television Camera was designed to operate either in the spacecraft or on the lunar surface with no adjustments except for lens changes. Lenses were all quick disconnect types so that they could be handled by an astronaut in a spacesuit.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Maintaining optical focus for all lenses under all environmental conditions required careful selection of mounting materials and methods. For example, the lenses were mounted directly to the tube assembly rather than to the camera case, which permits closer mouting tolerances to be maintainted.

Read more:
https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/WEC-Engineer-3-1968.pdf

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Television Cable Assembly (100ft)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Left on Moon at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: This cable was used to supply electricity to a black and white Westinghouse television camera of the type used to broadcast Neil Armstrong’s first step on the Moon to the world. The television camera, stowed inside the Modular Equipment Stowage Area (MESA) of lunar module decent stage, was activated just prior to the first steps via a lanyard system by the astronaut. After Armstrong’s historic first step, the television camera was moved to a stand away from the lunar module and connected to a longer power cable to allow wider angle television shots of lunar surface activities.
Image Source: NASA

Description

The cable assembly was used to set up the TV camera on the moon. The cable helped broadcast action on the moon to the world.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Adapter, SRC/OPS (two left on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Left on Moon at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Devices to convert attributes so as to make them compatible.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Per NASA: Two sample return containers (SRC) for returning up to 130 pounds of bulk and documented lunar samples. Items such as large and small sample bags, core tubes, gas analysis and lunar environment sample containers are stowed in the SRCs. The Oxygen Purge System (OPS) supplies the EMU with oxygen purge flow and pressure control for certain failure modes of the PLSS or PGA during EVA.

In the event of a PLSS failure, the OPS flow is regulated to 3.7 +/- 0.3 psid for 30 minutes to provide breathing oxygen to the crewman, to prevent excessive carbon dioxide buildup, and to provide limited cooling. In this mode, the crewman sets his purge valve in the high-flow position (8.1 pounds per hour). In a second mode, the OPS may be used to provide make-up flow to the PLSS oxygen ventilating circuit via the PGA at flow rates of 0.07 to 2.0 pounds per hour. Adapters for both the SRC and OPS were left behind for the return flight.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: ECS LiOH Cannister (two left on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Left on Moon at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: The lithium hydroxide canister was designed to maintain a pure-oxygen environment within the Apollo spacecraft by filtering out carbon dioxide, odors, and debris. The LiOH within the canister absorbed carbon dioxide, and carbon in the form of charcoal eliminated odors. The circulation within the spacecraft also carried debris to the canister, trapping it in the filter.
Image Sources: NASA and Air and Space Museum Smithsonian Institute

Description

The lithium hydroxide canister was designed as a replaceable filter for the environmental control unit (ECU). The ECU provided cooling, water and breathable oxygen for the astronauts’ suits and cabin. Two canisters were present in the oxygen system at all times and were alternately replaced, one every twelve hours. To maintain a safe pure-oxygen environment, the canisters contained lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and charcoal and were covered by a felt cloth barrier. The LiOH within the canister absorbed carbon dioxide, the charcoal eliminated odors, and the felt trapped particles and debris.

Read more:
https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/lithium-hydroxide-canister-command-module-apollo-11-0

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Small Urine Collection Assembly (two left on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Liquid waste (urine) collection.
Image Sources: NASA and Air and Space Museum Smithsonian Institute

Description

Liquid waste (urine) was collected in the device, which astronauts attached to themselves using roll-on cuffs to provide sanitary protection. The urine was then transferred through the metal transfer tube to a tank, from which the majority of liquid waste was vented into space. A small portion was freeze-dried and stored for testing upon return to Earth. (National Air and Space Museum)

Read more:
https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/collection-and-transfer-assembly-urine-apollo-11

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Large Urine Collection Assembly (two left on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Liquid waste (urine) collection.
Image Sources: NASA and Air and Space Museum Smithsonian Institute

Description

Liquid waste (urine) was collected in the device, which astronauts attached to themselves using roll-on cuffs to provide sanitary protection. The urine was then transferred through the metal transfer tube to a tank, from which the majority of liquid waste was vented into space. A small portion was freeze-dried and stored for testing upon return to Earth. (National Air and Space Museum)

Read more:
https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/collection-and-transfer-assembly-urine-apollo-11

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Emesis Bag (four left on site)
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Bags intended to capture vomit.
Image Sources: NASA and Air and Space Museum Smithsonian Institute

Description

The emesis bag was designed to permit for hygienic disposal of vomit. The emesis bags left on the Moon were empty. According to Biomedical Results of Apollo, the official published post-program report by the Apollo program physicians, while astronauts have vomited in space, none have done so on a lunar landing mission. The unlucky astronauts are Frank Borman (twice from stomach flu) of Apollo 8, Russell Schweickart (twice from motion sickness) of Apollo 9, and Fred Haise (once from an unknown virus) of Apollo 13.

Read more:
https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2014/11/moon-puke-lunar-vomit.html

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Disposal Container Assembly
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

Object on or Related to Site

Object Name: Disposal Container Assembly
Cospar: N/A
Norad: N/A
Location: Precise location unknown or undisclosed.
Launch Date: 16 July 1969, 13:32:00 UT
Landing Date: 20 July 1969, 20:17:40 UT
Deployment: Jettisoned at end of mission.
End Date: N/A
Function: Information needed.
Image Source: NASA

Description

Information needed.

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The Apollo 10 mission encompassed all aspects of an actual crewed lunar landing, except the landing. It was the first to operate around the Moon. Objectives included a scheduled eight-hour lunar orbit of the separated lunar module, or LM, and descent to about nine miles off the Moon's surface before
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